Terms of Use



The following Terms of Use apply to visitors to the NYC OpenData portal and application developers who obtain City data through this single web portal:


By accessing data sets and feeds available through the NYC OpenData portal (or the "Site"), the user agrees to all of the Terms of Use of NYC.gov as well as the Privacy Policy for NYC.gov. The user also agrees to any additional terms of use defined by entities providing data or feeds through the Site. Entities providing data include, without limitation, agencies, bureaus, offices, departments and other discrete entities of the City of New York ("City"). Public data sets made available on the NYC OpenData portal are provided for informational purposes. The City does not warranty the completeness, accuracy, content, or fitness for any particular purpose or use of any public data set made available on the NYC OpenData portal, nor are any such warranties to be implied or inferred with respect to the public data sets furnished therein.


The City is not liable for any deficiencies in the completeness, accuracy, content, or fitness for any particular purpose or use of any public data set, or application utilizing such data set, provided by any third party.


Submitting City Agencies are the authoritative source of data available on NYC OpenData. These entities are responsible for data quality and retain version control of data sets and feeds accessed on the Site. Data may be updated, corrected, overwritten and/or refreshed at any time. The anticipated update frequency is indicated for each data set on the Site. Older versions of data sets will not be retained.

About NYC Open Data



NYC Open Data makes the wealth of public data generated by various New York City agencies and other City organizations available for public use. As part of an initiative to improve the accessibility, transparency, and accountability of City government, this catalog offers access to a repository of government-produced, machine-readable data sets.


Anyone can use these data sets to participate in and improve government by conducting research and analysis or creating applications, thereby gaining a better understanding of the services provided by City agencies and improving the lives of citizens and the way in which government serves them.


The data sets are available in a variety of machine-readable formats and are refreshed when new data becomes available. Data is presented by category, by City agency, or by other City organization. Descriptions of the data, the collection method, and other contextual material, called metadata, make the data sets easier to understand and use. Use of these data sets and how they are generated can be better understood by reading the Terms of Use.



How the City Uses Data to Create a Better City



The Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics (MODA), the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DOITT), and NYC Digital work together to collect, analyze, and share NYC Data, to create a better City supported by data-based decision making, and to promote public use of City data.


The City of New York is a national model for collecting data to measure government performance. Agencies routinely collect data on buildings, streets, infrastructure, businesses, and other entities within the City, including permits, licenses, crime related data, and 311 complaints. MODA centralizes City data, uniting previously disconnected pieces of information from various agencies, and pairs it with NY state, federal, and other open data to create a comprehensive City-wide data platform that serves as a record of City activity, and a foundation for NYC Open Data. DoITT and MODA work closely together to use that platform, DataBridge, to reduce safety risk in the City, deliver daily services more efficiently, and enforce laws more effectively.


The mission of NYC Digital is to realize New York City's potential as the world's leading digital city, by creating meaningful public-private partnerships that serve New Yorkers and support economic development. NYC Digital produces the City's Digital Roadmap, NYC's technology plan for access, education, open government, engagement, and industry. In partnership with MODA, NYC Digital directs Code Corps, the nation's first municipal program that engages vetted volunteer technologists to support City emergency and disaster recovery needs.

NYC Collaboration with OpenStreetMap

The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.

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NYC Collaboration with OpenStreetMap

The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.

The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.

The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.


The team at Mapbox created this impressive animation highlighting two NYC OpenData sets being imported into OpenStreetMap: building footprints and address points in New York City.


The OpenStreetMap (OSM) community is adding vital NYC OpenData to the OSM database.


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Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.

Reblogged from nychealth:

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.

Reblogged from nychealth:

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.


Reblogged from nychealth:


Noise in NYC


Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.


Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.


To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:


  • 4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 

  • 3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.

  • More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:


  • 111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.

  • More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.

  • 1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.

  • 311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.

  • Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

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While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 

This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 

This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.

While New York City is among the nation’s most dense cities, the Department of City Planning's Projected Population 2000 - 2030 dataset, available on the NYC Open Data portal, provides borough population projections that demonstrate how density differs across  the five boroughs. 


This graphic shows the approximate population per square mile in each borough in 2000, as well as 2030 projected population per square mile.


View DCP’s Population Projections.


Learn more about how the Department of City Planning estimates population. 


Visit the NYC Open Data portal.


Update April 17, 2014: DCP has released revised population predictions through 2040 on the NYC Open Data portal

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Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 

In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”

Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 

In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”

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Ben Wellington, who teaches a statistics course in the City & Regional Planning program at Pratt in Brooklyn recently released two visualizations using data from the NYC OpenData portal. In the image above, he used the Department of Sanitation’s Monthly Tonnages dataset to explore recycling rates in the five boroughs. 


In the image below, he used the street name dictionary and GIS line street base map datasets to visualize street suffixes across the city, showing patterns in planning and street naming. He writes, “Manhattan is made up of mostly streets…the Bronx has the most avenues proportionally, and Queens has the most roads. Staten Island has the largest percentages of lanes and courts, which might go along with its suburban layout.”


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In addition to using NYC OpenData in his own work (see more visualizations on his blog, I Quant NY), Ben employs public data from the NYC OpenData portal in his statistics classes at Pratt. Bringing open data into the classroom allows his students to explore their city and analyze information that’s relevant to their interests as urban planners, whether transportation, health inspection, education or other data. 


Check out Ben’s work on Citywide recycling patterns here.


Check out Ben’s work on Street Suffixes here. 


View more open data on the NYC OpenData Portal. 

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The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

The Taxi and Limousine Commission recently launched a Car Service “Basefinder”! Use the interactive map to locate the nearest car service/livery base. The map also indicates which bases have wheelchair accessible vehicles. Access the map of taxi bases via NYC OpenData: http://bit.ly/1mfYJS5

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New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.

Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.

Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

New York City is going global (and local!); in 2011, 15 New Yorkers were named Brooklyn, 15 were named Dakota, 10 were named Kenya, and 129 were named London. Though none of these names made the top twenty for either boys or girls, this graphic shows the baby names that dominated both the City and New York State.


Data for the most popular New York City names comes from the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene’s "Most Popular Baby Names by Sex and Mother’s Ethnicity" dataset, available on the NYC Open Data Portal, while data on New York State names is available on the New York State Open NY website.

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The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills

So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.

The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills

So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.

The NYC Property Tax Explorer combines the Department of City Planning’s MapPLUTO data, available on NYC OpenData, with information on estimated market value, assessed value, building type, tax rate, and annual tax from NYC property tax bills


So far the team (Chris Whong, Akil Harris, and Ameen Solemanihas mapped property tax bills at the tax lot level for Manhattan, with other boroughs coming soon.


Thanks to BetaNYC for hosting this year’s #CodeAcross NYC civic technology hackathon and inspiring tools like this.

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This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson

Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

This map shows the locations of NYC bike lane parking violations. Built using the ArcGIS Online Storytelling Text and Legend web application template by Tom Swanson


Get parking violation data via NYC OpenData. 

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Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 

Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   

Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 

Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   

Check out this great infographic from NYC Taxi and learn about the impact of hybrid taxis on NYC. 


Visit the NYC OpenData portal to access a range of transportation data, including the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s active drivers and licensed vehicles.   





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DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.

Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation

DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.

Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation

DoITT recently updated and automated a number of datasets, including the Department of Health and Mental Health’s flu vaccine locations and farmers market locations, the Department of Sanitation’s monthly tonnages and graffiti removal, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s lost property and active drivers, among others. The real time information in these datasets begins to tell the story of our city – from over 2,000 medical providers participating in NYC REACH, to over 51,000 active medallion taxi drivers, and the 140 farmers markets located across the city.


Monthly Tonnages, Department of Sanitation


Graffiti Information, Department of Sanitation


Lost Property Contact Information, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Active Medallion Drivers, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Authorized Medallion Vehicles, Taxi and Limousine Commission


Seasonal Flu Vaccine Locations, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


Farmers Markets, Department of Health and Mental Hygiene


NYC REACH (Regional Electronic Adoption Center for Health) Participants, Department of Health & Mental Hygiene


Visit the NYC OpenData portal at nyc.gov/data to access these new datasets and much more. 


Photo credit: littleny

How NYC is using data to fight fires

The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: ”How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining”

Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: ”How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining”

Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

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The Wall Street Journal recently featured the New York City Fire Department’s work to reduce fires by developing targeted inspection criteria. The new predictive model synthesizes roughly 60 factors that are correlated with deadly fires, including the age of a building, electrical issues, the number of sprinklers, and the presence of elevators, and builds an algorithm that assigns each building with a risk score. Using those scores, the City is able to target inspections to buildings with the highest risk. Read the full article: ”How New York’s Fire Department Uses Data Mining”


Image: NYC fire incidents within commercial and high-rise buildings via FDNY Analytics. 

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Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.

Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more 

Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.

Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more 

Today’s data visualization shows the density of foot traffic across the five boroughs. This just one of the many resources available to help local small businesses make marketing and location decisions through the new NYC Business Atlas.


Map of NYC foot traffic via Placemeter. Learn more 

Featuring the final winners of #Reinvent311: Pediacities & FeedNYC

Today we’re featuring the two final winners of the #Reinvent311 competition. Pediacities won for the best integration of the 311 Content API into an existing mobile tool, app or website and FeedNYC was the Judge’s Pick. 

Pediacities

Today we’re featuring the two final winners of the #Reinvent311 competition. Pediacities won for the best integration of the 311 Content API into an existing mobile tool, app or website and FeedNYC was the Judge’s Pick. 

Pediacities

Today we’re featuring the two final winners of the #Reinvent311 competition. Pediacities won for the best integration of the 311 Content API into an existing mobile tool, app or website and FeedNYC was the Judge’s Pick. 


Pediacities


These former winners of the NYC BigApps competition came to the #Reinvent311 challenge to share their NYCPedia neighborhoods platform, a data encyclopedia about New York City where users can search by neighborhood or zip code to find local community facilities, services, demographic information, news, and events. This neighborhood profile incorporates 7,344 city facilities. To develop their community pages Pediacities used the Open311 API and the GeoSupport Client API.  image


FeedNYC


Jacob Budin’s FeedNYC mobile web app locates food pantries, soup kitchens and senior centers by neighborhood, or by the day or time that an individual is looking for assistance. The clean interface and clear user experience draws information from Open311 API and the Food Bank for New York City. Find out more about FeedNYC on Jacob’s website.


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Winners of #311 Mobile Content Challenge

Today we’re featuring two of the five #Reinvent311 competition winners. Apartment Report was awarded best presentation of 311 information on a specific topic and Homeless Helper for best presentation of 311 information targeting a specific audience. 

Apartment Report

Today we’re featuring two of the five #Reinvent311 competition winners. Apartment Report was awarded best presentation of 311 information on a specific topic and Homeless Helper for best presentation of 311 information targeting a specific audience. 

Apartment Report

Today we’re featuring two of the five #Reinvent311 competition winners. Apartment Report was awarded best presentation of 311 information on a specific topic and Homeless Helper for best presentation of 311 information targeting a specific audience. 


Apartment Report


Robert Dunning started his presentation by asking how many people in the room had rented an apartment – as expected, nearly every hand rose. His project, Apartment Report, provides instant access to information about properties across the five boroughs. By combining Google Maps and Google Street View with City data such as the Department of Buildings violations, Housing Preservation & Development violations, 311 complaints at a property, bedbug registry, school zone search, and NYC Finance data, Apartment NYC reveals the important, invisible story of a property, enabling renters to make informed choices.


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Homeless Helper


Developed by Rasmi Elasmar, Homeless Helper is an app aimed at helping homeless persons in need. In addition to providing critical information such as the locations of food pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters.

#Reinvent311 Mobile Content Challenge

In a City where 70% of 311 calls are resolved simply by providing information, the #Reinvent311 challenge asked civic technologists to develop mobile tools to provide 311 information more quickly and effectively. On January 15, #Reinvent311 finalists from across the city came together to share the tools they developed using the 311 Content API, the 311 Service Request dataset and other open City data. From a searchable index of all City facilities to a comprehensive “Apartment Report,” these tools affirmed the depth and breadth of 311 content and demonstrated new mobile opportunities for 311 content delivery. Thanks to all of the participants for their work and to the sponsors, NYC 311, NYC Digital, NYC DoITT, Stack Exchange and Code for America/BetaNYC!

Photo courtesy of @aribajahan

In a City where 70% of 311 calls are resolved simply by providing information, the #Reinvent311 challenge asked civic technologists to develop mobile tools to provide 311 information more quickly and effectively. On January 15, #Reinvent311 finalists from across the city came together to share the tools they developed using the 311 Content API, the 311 Service Request dataset and other open City data. From a searchable index of all City facilities to a comprehensive “Apartment Report,” these tools affirmed the depth and breadth of 311 content and demonstrated new mobile opportunities for 311 content delivery. Thanks to all of the participants for their work and to the sponsors, NYC 311, NYC Digital, NYC DoITT, Stack Exchange and Code for America/BetaNYC!

Photo courtesy of @aribajahan

In a City where 70% of 311 calls are resolved simply by providing information, the #Reinvent311 challenge asked civic technologists to develop mobile tools to provide 311 information more quickly and effectively. On January 15, #Reinvent311 finalists from across the city came together to share the tools they developed using the 311 Content API, the 311 Service Request dataset and other open City data. From a searchable index of all City facilities to a comprehensive “Apartment Report,” these tools affirmed the depth and breadth of 311 content and demonstrated new mobile opportunities for 311 content delivery. Thanks to all of the participants for their work and to the sponsors, NYC 311, NYC Digital, NYC DoITT, Stack Exchange and Code for America/BetaNYC!


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Photo courtesy of @aribajahan


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 Photo courtesy of @nycdigital


Today we’re featuring one of the five competition winners. NYC Cares was selected for the best presentation of 311 information on a mobile platform. Stay tuned for upcoming posts on other #Reinvent311 mobile tools!


NYC Cares: Developers, Chris Smith and Aileen Smith of Vizalytics introduced a unique approach for sharing 311 information for food insecure individuals. After identifying seniors as a user group in need of improved access to 311 information, they developed their app, NYC Cares, provides a geographically sorted list of nearby food pantries and shelters, which individuals can use to find services. NYC Cares also allows users to send a simple SMS text of their search results to an individual in need, thereby enabling NYC residents to help each other by providing and sharing 311 information.  Check out a video on NYC Cares here.

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nycdoitt:

Visit the new NYC Business Atlas, an interactive map launched by DoITT, the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, and the Departments of Small Business Services. This new tool helps small businesses better understand the economic conditions in their neighborhoods by combining information on population demographics with business filings, tax receipts, and pedestrian activity. Available at maps.nyc.gov/businessatlas/ – the Business Atlas enables local businesses to make better decisions about where to open their doors and how to operate

nycdoitt:

Visit the new NYC Business Atlas, an interactive map launched by DoITT, the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, and the Departments of Small Business Services. This new tool helps small businesses better understand the economic conditions in their neighborhoods by combining information on population demographics with business filings, tax receipts, and pedestrian activity. Available at maps.nyc.gov/businessatlas/ – the Business Atlas enables local businesses to make better decisions about where to open their doors and how to operate

nycdoitt:



Visit the new NYC Business Atlas, an interactive map launched by DoITT, the Mayor’s Office of Data Analytics, and the Departments of Small Business Services. This new tool helps small businesses better understand the economic conditions in their neighborhoods by combining information on population demographics with business filings, tax receipts, and pedestrian activity. Available at maps.nyc.gov/businessatlas/ – the Business Atlas enables local businesses to make better decisions about where to open their doors and how to operate


According to NYC Chief Analytics Officer Mike Flowers: “This project is an extension of the City’s Open Data efforts. Data transparency means better information for those that live and work in our neighborhoods, and that means more than just raw numbers. The Business Atlas is an easy-to-use visualization that shows that you don’t need to be a data scientist to make good use of NYC data.”


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Check out this 3D visualization showing the location and density of Manhattan’s street trees. Ken Steif created the map using NYC Parks tree census data available via NYC OpenData. 

Get Manhattan Tree Census Data

Check out this 3D visualization showing the location and density of Manhattan’s street trees. Ken Steif created the map using NYC Parks tree census data available via NYC OpenData. 

Get Manhattan Tree Census Data

Check out this 3D visualization showing the location and density of Manhattan’s street trees. Ken Steif created the map using NYC Parks tree census data available via NYC OpenData. 


Get Manhattan Tree Census Data

Reinvent 311: Mobile Content Challenge

nycdigital:

Did you know that 311 gets 65,000 inquiries a day?

nycdigital:

Did you know that 311 gets 65,000 inquiries a day?

nycdigital:



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Did you know that 311 gets 65,000 inquiries a day?


Hosted by The City of New York, Code for America and Stack Exchange, we are inviting urban technologists, content creators, media professionals, civic developers and interested hackers to partner with NYC 311 and help make vital customer service information accessible on the web and through mobile devices.


Help us Reinvent 311. Register now for the Reinvent 311 mobile content challenge from November 26 - January 15, 2014: http://on.nyc.gov/Reinvent311


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Interested in learning how people are using NYC OpenData? Visit NYC OpenData Analytics for info on page views, and a running count of datasets, maps, and charts available on the OpenData portal.  Additionally, the analytics tool shows the most viewed datasets, the top referrers to the portal, search terms and embeds, providing a comprehensive picture of the types of NYC data being used each day.

Check out other open data program analytics:

Interested in learning how people are using NYC OpenData? Visit NYC OpenData Analytics for info on page views, and a running count of datasets, maps, and charts available on the OpenData portal.  Additionally, the analytics tool shows the most viewed datasets, the top referrers to the portal, search terms and embeds, providing a comprehensive picture of the types of NYC data being used each day.

Check out other open data program analytics:

Interested in learning how people are using NYC OpenData? Visit NYC OpenData Analytics for info on page views, and a running count of datasets, maps, and charts available on the OpenData portal.  Additionally, the analytics tool shows the most viewed datasets, the top referrers to the portal, search terms and embeds, providing a comprehensive picture of the types of NYC data being used each day.


Check out other open data program analytics:


Austin
Baltimore
San Francisco
Seattle
Data.gov

Tracking NYC OpenData Progress

Check out the NYC OpenData Dashboard to explore the datasets City agencies have released and plan to release moving forward. Discover new datasets and how frequently they are updated. Quickly sort by agency and available dataset or download data and learn more more about the information New York City is releasing to the public. 

Check out the NYC OpenData Dashboard to explore the datasets City agencies have released and plan to release moving forward. Discover new datasets and how frequently they are updated. Quickly sort by agency and available dataset or download data and learn more more about the information New York City is releasing to the public. 

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Check out the NYC OpenData Dashboard to explore the datasets City agencies have released and plan to release moving forward. Discover new datasets and how frequently they are updated. Quickly sort by agency and available dataset or download data and learn more more about the information New York City is releasing to the public. 

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Each year, 80,000 NYC 8th grade students apply to high school choosing from more than 700 options. Yesterday, the NYC Department of Education’s Innovation team (iZone) held the School Choice Design Challenge Demo Night featuring new apps aimed at helping families navigate the admissions process.

Each year, 80,000 NYC 8th grade students apply to high school choosing from more than 700 options. Yesterday, the NYC Department of Education’s Innovation team (iZone) held the School Choice Design Challenge Demo Night featuring new apps aimed at helping families navigate the admissions process.

Each year, 80,000 NYC 8th grade students apply to high school choosing from more than 700 options. Yesterday, the NYC Department of Education’s Innovation team (iZone) held the School Choice Design Challenge Demo Night featuring new apps aimed at helping families navigate the admissions process.



For the challenge, Pediacities, former NYC BigApps winners and data platform providers, created a set of public APIs (data integration tools), so developers could easily integrate NYC high school data into their applications. Six apps are now live helping students discover the best school based on criteria like location, extracurricular activities, or entrance requirements.


Image: FindTheBest  - the SCDC winning app selected by a panel of 9th grade students as part of the School Choice Design Challenge. 

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New York City’s air quality has reached the cleanest levels in more than 50 years. According to the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, between 1990 and 2012, the global share of CO2 emissions from industrialized countries fell from 69% to 41%. At the same time, the share from developing countries is rapidly rising.

Check out this animated visualization of global CO2 emissions created by The World Bank

New York City’s air quality has reached the cleanest levels in more than 50 years. According to the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, between 1990 and 2012, the global share of CO2 emissions from industrialized countries fell from 69% to 41%. At the same time, the share from developing countries is rapidly rising.

Check out this animated visualization of global CO2 emissions created by The World Bank

New York City’s air quality has reached the cleanest levels in more than 50 years. According to the PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, between 1990 and 2012, the global share of CO2 emissions from industrialized countries fell from 69% to 41%. At the same time, the share from developing countries is rapidly rising.


Check out this animated visualization of global CO2 emissions created by The World Bank


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Data from various sources including The UNThe World BankThe IMF.


Access NYC environmental open data

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Check out these great infographics detailing everything Citi Bike NYC. Since the bike share launched in May 2013, cyclists have traveled a total distance of 6,840,606 miles or 275 trips around the world!

Thanks to Zack Davenport and Michael Yap for sharing the stories.

Check out these great infographics detailing everything Citi Bike NYC. Since the bike share launched in May 2013, cyclists have traveled a total distance of 6,840,606 miles or 275 trips around the world!

Thanks to Zack Davenport and Michael Yap for sharing the stories.

Check out these great infographics detailing everything Citi Bike NYC. Since the bike share launched in May 2013, cyclists have traveled a total distance of 6,840,606 miles or 275 trips around the world!


Thanks to Zack Davenport and Michael Yap for sharing the stories.


Get Citi Bike Data: http://citibikenyc.com/system-data

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New York City is gathering data, processing data, and distributing data like never before. Listen to the BBC’s story on the City’s data efforts

New York City is gathering data, processing data, and distributing data like never before. Listen to the BBC’s story on the City’s data efforts


New York City is gathering data, processing data, and distributing data like never before. Listen to the BBC’s story on the City’s data efforts

Visualizing NYC 311 Requests By Zipcode

Check out this visualization of 311 service requests from 2010 to the present by zipcode. Use the drop down menu on the left to select and map different service requests.

Get NYC 311 data via NYC Open Data - www.nyc.gov/data

Check out this visualization of 311 service requests from 2010 to the present by zipcode. Use the drop down menu on the left to select and map different service requests.

Get NYC 311 data via NYC Open Data - www.nyc.gov/data

Check out this visualization of 311 service requests from 2010 to the present by zipcode. Use the drop down menu on the left to select and map different service requests.


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Get NYC 311 data via NYC Open Data - www.nyc.gov/data


Thanks to Jonathan Roberts for developing and sharing the map.

NYC Open Data Plan

The inaugural edition of the NYC Open Data Plan includes approximately 440 city agency public data sets, the release date, and update frequency for each set. Created following the guidelines set forth in Local Law 11 of 2012, historic legislation signed by Mayor Bloomberg in March 2012, the plan ensures the ongoing release of public data.

The next milestone comes in July 2014, when DoITT begins publishing annual updates to the City’s Open Data Plan, detailing the progress in opening public data sets since the previous report. All public data must be opened by December 31, 2018.

The inaugural edition of the NYC Open Data Plan includes approximately 440 city agency public data sets, the release date, and update frequency for each set. Created following the guidelines set forth in Local Law 11 of 2012, historic legislation signed by Mayor Bloomberg in March 2012, the plan ensures the ongoing release of public data.

The next milestone comes in July 2014, when DoITT begins publishing annual updates to the City’s Open Data Plan, detailing the progress in opening public data sets since the previous report. All public data must be opened by December 31, 2018.



The inaugural edition of the NYC Open Data Plan includes approximately 440 city agency public data sets, the release date, and update frequency for each set. Created following the guidelines set forth in Local Law 11 of 2012, historic legislation signed by Mayor Bloomberg in March 2012, the plan ensures the ongoing release of public data.


The next milestone comes in July 2014, when DoITT begins publishing annual updates to the City’s Open Data Plan, detailing the progress in opening public data sets since the previous report. All public data must be opened by December 31, 2018.

An Interactive Guide to NYC OpenData

This interactive graphic shows the range and quantity of data available on the NYC OpenData portal.

Filter by category - business, city government, education, environment, health, housing & development, social services and more - to explore the City’s trove of unique open datasets and user-created views.

This interactive graphic shows the range and quantity of data available on the NYC OpenData portal.

Filter by category - business, city government, education, environment, health, housing & development, social services and more - to explore the City’s trove of unique open datasets and user-created views.

This interactive graphic shows the range and quantity of data available on the NYC OpenData portal.




Filter by category - business, city government, education, environment, health, housing & development, social services and more - to explore the City’s trove of unique open datasets and user-created views.


Created by Ben Jones and available via OpenDataSites.

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Visualizing NYC’s 1,100+ Datasets

Chris Whong recently visualized New York City’s 1,100+ open datasets, bundling them by category — business, education, social services, transportation, recreation, etc. By clicking on one of the dots you are taken to the specific dataset on NYC OpenData. 

Visualizing NYC’s 1,100+ Datasets

Chris Whong recently visualized New York City’s 1,100+ open datasets, bundling them by category — business, education, social services, transportation, recreation, etc. By clicking on one of the dots you are taken to the specific dataset on NYC OpenData. 

Visualizing NYC’s 1,100+ Datasets


Chris Whong recently visualized New York City’s 1,100+ open datasets, bundling them by category — business, education, social services, transportation, recreation, etc. By clicking on one of the dots you are taken to the specific dataset on NYC OpenData. 


According to a post on the Code for America Brigade Tumblr, ”this is a force-directed graph generated with the charting library d3.js. NYC’s open data portal runs on the Socrata platform and this visualization was created using the “dataset of datasets" and the Socrata Open Data API (SODA).”


Check out the data visualization of NYC OpenData here

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Visit EnergyZip to learn about New York City’s electricity use. This map application, developed by a team of research scientists for the 2013 NYC BigApps competition, lets you compare your usage against future use, your neighbors, and other areas across the five boroughs.  

EnergyZip uses the electricity consumption by zip code and PLUTO (Primary Land Use Tax Lot Output) datasets, both available on NYC OpenData.

Visit EnergyZip to learn about New York City’s electricity use. This map application, developed by a team of research scientists for the 2013 NYC BigApps competition, lets you compare your usage against future use, your neighbors, and other areas across the five boroughs.  

EnergyZip uses the electricity consumption by zip code and PLUTO (Primary Land Use Tax Lot Output) datasets, both available on NYC OpenData.

Visit EnergyZip to learn about New York City’s electricity use. This map application, developed by a team of research scientists for the 2013 NYC BigApps competition, lets you compare your usage against future use, your neighbors, and other areas across the five boroughs.  


EnergyZip uses the electricity consumption by zip code and PLUTO (Primary Land Use Tax Lot Output) datasets, both available on NYC OpenData.


Special thanks to BetaNYC for hosting a series of events exploring PLUTO data ideas and projects including yesterday’s #CivicDemoNight

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Explore the peaks and valleys of New York City’s skyline! Using PLUTO data @AndrewxHill represents the height of buildings by the number of floors. Take a look at this and a series of other fascinating PLUTO visualizations

Access PLUTO & mapPLUTO  data. 

Explore the peaks and valleys of New York City’s skyline! Using PLUTO data @AndrewxHill represents the height of buildings by the number of floors. Take a look at this and a series of other fascinating PLUTO visualizations

Access PLUTO & mapPLUTO  data. 

Explore the peaks and valleys of New York City’s skyline! Using PLUTO data @AndrewxHill represents the height of buildings by the number of floors. Take a look at this and a series of other fascinating PLUTO visualizations


Access PLUTO & mapPLUTO  data. 

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Check out this incredible geodata visualization of Brooklyn’s buildings color-coded to the year they were built. Using Department of City Planning data available through the NYC OpenData portal, the interactive map allows users to hover over buildings to see the address and year-built.

Get recently added PLUTO & mapPLUTO  data. 

Check out this incredible geodata visualization of Brooklyn’s buildings color-coded to the year they were built. Using Department of City Planning data available through the NYC OpenData portal, the interactive map allows users to hover over buildings to see the address and year-built.

Get recently added PLUTO & mapPLUTO  data. 

Check out this incredible geodata visualization of Brooklyn’s buildings color-coded to the year they were built. Using Department of City Planning data available through the NYC OpenData portal, the interactive map allows users to hover over buildings to see the address and year-built.


Get recently added PLUTO & mapPLUTO  data. 


Thanks to @thomasrhiel at the BKLYNER for the post.  

Using Open Data to Get Drivers On the Road

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

The New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) was created in 1971, and is the agency responsible for the regulation and licensing of almost 200,000 yellow medallion taxicabs and for-hire vehicles, their drivers, and the businesses that operate and support their industries. It is recognized as the largest and most active taxi and limousine regulatory body in the US. Among those licensees are a combined 100,000 medallion taxicab and for-hire vehicle drivers, for whom access to information about the status of their licenses means the difference between staying home and providing their services for the day.

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

The New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) was created in 1971, and is the agency responsible for the regulation and licensing of almost 200,000 yellow medallion taxicabs and for-hire vehicles, their drivers, and the businesses that operate and support their industries. It is recognized as the largest and most active taxi and limousine regulatory body in the US. Among those licensees are a combined 100,000 medallion taxicab and for-hire vehicle drivers, for whom access to information about the status of their licenses means the difference between staying home and providing their services for the day.

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As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.


The New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC) was created in 1971, and is the agency responsible for the regulation and licensing of almost 200,000 yellow medallion taxicabs and for-hire vehicles, their drivers, and the businesses that operate and support their industries. It is recognized as the largest and most active taxi and limousine regulatory body in the US. Among those licensees are a combined 100,000 medallion taxicab and for-hire vehicle drivers, for whom access to information about the status of their licenses means the difference between staying home and providing their services for the day.


TLC’s data on current licensees used to be manually uploaded by a TLC employee, which required significant time and effort. Now the TLC is starting to use the NYC OpenData portal to keep drivers informed of licensing changes by sharing information directly from the TLC mainframe. 


The data provides information on valid/invalid medallion driver and vehicle licenses as well as a list of drivers who have completed Passenger Assistance Training. This process is not only a much more efficient means of updating information, but also an empowering measure for the city’s bustling taxi industry. Drivers are able to check their licensing status more quickly than ever before and can access historical information about their license status on a given date. OpenData also allows users to download and access list information in a variety of formats and views including an application programming interface (API) that can enable more sophisticated users to fully automate their list processing.


Most importantly, since no manual intervention is required, TLC can now publish the data six days a week, enabling licensees who correct license problems late on a Friday to drive on the weekend. Drivers gain extra business while making more cabs available to the public.


Other TLC records have been spotlighted before, including its log of taxi compliments filed through NYC311, the City’s non-emergency information and service center.



Learn more about TLC datasets

DoITT Introduces Facebook to NYC OpenData

On July 10, a team of DoITT and NYCEDC employees introduced NYC OpenData to Facebook engineers at one of the company’s internal hackathons in Manhattan.

Albert Webber, Program Coordinator for NYC OpenData, outlined how to access and use NYC datasets and APIs, and described the benefits of open government. Chelsea Rao, NYCEDC’s Vice President at the Center for Economic Transformation, and Noelle Marcus, an NYCEDC Project Manager, discussed NYC BigApps, the annual app competition that challenges developers to create tools using open data. This year’s winners used City datasets to engineer apps that help improve public health, assist parents in searching for child care, and link New Yorkers with social services around the City.

On July 10, a team of DoITT and NYCEDC employees introduced NYC OpenData to Facebook engineers at one of the company’s internal hackathons in Manhattan.

Albert Webber, Program Coordinator for NYC OpenData, outlined how to access and use NYC datasets and APIs, and described the benefits of open government. Chelsea Rao, NYCEDC’s Vice President at the Center for Economic Transformation, and Noelle Marcus, an NYCEDC Project Manager, discussed NYC BigApps, the annual app competition that challenges developers to create tools using open data. This year’s winners used City datasets to engineer apps that help improve public health, assist parents in searching for child care, and link New Yorkers with social services around the City.

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On July 10, a team of DoITT and NYCEDC employees introduced NYC OpenData to Facebook engineers at one of the company’s internal hackathons in Manhattan.


Albert Webber, Program Coordinator for NYC OpenData, outlined how to access and use NYC datasets and APIs, and described the benefits of open government. Chelsea Rao, NYCEDC’s Vice President at the Center for Economic Transformation, and Noelle Marcus, an NYCEDC Project Manager, discussed NYC BigApps, the annual app competition that challenges developers to create tools using open data. This year’s winners used City datasets to engineer apps that help improve public health, assist parents in searching for child care, and link New Yorkers with social services around the City.


Facebook’s internal hackathons encourage employees to explore projects outside of their day-to-day responsibilities. NYC OpenData helps the City build partnerships with the tech sector by offering free access to more than 1000 datasets on a wide range of City operations, including cultural affairs, transportation, education, health, housing, and more. 



Inspired by Open Data: Mapping WiFi Hotspots

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

Today we’re featuring Kevin Wolkober’s story — how NYC OpenData inspired him to build his first mobile app. Kevin, a self-taught app programmer, was motivated to enter the world of mobile app development by the trove of City data available on the NYC OpenData portal.

“I saw huge potential for geo-location apps that could help New Yorkers and visitors navigate the city,” said Kevin Wolkober. “I thought that the NYC WiFi locations dataset, in particular, would be great if it was available on-the-go.”

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

Today we’re featuring Kevin Wolkober’s story — how NYC OpenData inspired him to build his first mobile app. Kevin, a self-taught app programmer, was motivated to enter the world of mobile app development by the trove of City data available on the NYC OpenData portal.

“I saw huge potential for geo-location apps that could help New Yorkers and visitors navigate the city,” said Kevin Wolkober. “I thought that the NYC WiFi locations dataset, in particular, would be great if it was available on-the-go.”

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.


Today we’re featuring Kevin Wolkober’s story — how NYC OpenData inspired him to build his first mobile app. Kevin, a self-taught app programmer, was motivated to enter the world of mobile app development by the trove of City data available on the NYC OpenData portal.

“I saw huge potential for geo-location apps that could help New Yorkers and visitors navigate the city,” said Kevin Wolkober. “I thought that the NYC WiFi locations dataset, in particular, would be great if it was available on-the-go.”


Kevin’s first iPhone app, NYC Wi-Fi, is a map-based tool that uses the NYC WiFi dataset to make it easier for people to find the nearest web connection wherever they are in the city. Kevin is now working for a New York-based mobile development company specializing in iOS applications.




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NYC Relief Map

Check out this relief map of New York City - created by DoITT’s mappers from the NYC terrain elevation data available now via the NYC OpenData Portal. 

Access the digital elevation data set:

Check out this relief map of New York City - created by DoITT’s mappers from the NYC terrain elevation data available now via the NYC OpenData Portal. 

Access the digital elevation data set:

Check out this relief map of New York City - created by DoITT’s mappers from the NYC terrain elevation data available now via the NYC OpenData Portal. 


Access the digital elevation data set:




 

Hurricane Evacuation Zones on NYC OpenData

Updates to NYC’s Hurricane Evacuation Zones were announced today. The new Zones, 1 through 6, replace Zones A, B and C, and now include an additional 600,000 New Yorkers not included within the boundaries of the former zones. 

To find your zone, visit: nyc.gov/hurricanezones.  

Updates to NYC’s Hurricane Evacuation Zones were announced today. The new Zones, 1 through 6, replace Zones A, B and C, and now include an additional 600,000 New Yorkers not included within the boundaries of the former zones. 

To find your zone, visit: nyc.gov/hurricanezones.  

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Updates to NYC’s Hurricane Evacuation Zones were announced today. The new Zones, 1 through 6, replace Zones A, B and C, and now include an additional 600,000 New Yorkers not included within the boundaries of the former zones. 


To find your zone, visit: nyc.gov/hurricanezones.  


NYC’s new hurricane evacuation zones are also available as a dataset on the NYC OpenData portal. 


New York City's $74 billion 2013 modified budget visualized

Check out this visualization of New York City’s $74 billion 2013 modified budget. Circle sizes correspond to each agency’s budget and the color shows the percent change. This interactive visualization is in the style of an NYT visualization of the federal budget proposal.

Check out this visualization of New York City’s $74 billion 2013 modified budget. Circle sizes correspond to each agency’s budget and the color shows the percent change. This interactive visualization is in the style of an NYT visualization of the federal budget proposal.




Check out this visualization of New York City’s $74 billion 2013 modified budget. Circle sizes correspond to each agency’s budget and the color shows the percent change. This interactive visualization is in the style of an NYT visualization of the federal budget proposal.

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As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

We recently spoke with the founders of Exversion, a Made in NY startup that helps make open data more accessible.  Created in just 72 hours on the Startup bus, the Exversion alpha launched in mid-May aggregating and distributing thousands of open datasets.  The density visualization above is one of their most-accessed datasets – the geo-location of H1B visa-application work sites.

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

We recently spoke with the founders of Exversion, a Made in NY startup that helps make open data more accessible.  Created in just 72 hours on the Startup bus, the Exversion alpha launched in mid-May aggregating and distributing thousands of open datasets.  The density visualization above is one of their most-accessed datasets – the geo-location of H1B visa-application work sites.

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As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.


We recently spoke with the founders of Exversion, a Made in NY startup that helps make open data more accessible.  Created in just 72 hours on the Startup bus, the Exversion alpha launched in mid-May aggregating and distributing thousands of open datasets.  The density visualization above is one of their most-accessed datasets – the geo-location of H1B visa-application work sites.


“Dealing with open data can be a frustrating experience. First it’s hard to find the data you’re looking for – the information is siloed across multiple portals and platforms, so you spend a lot of time up front just looking for the portal as opposed to the dataset. Then, when you locate your dataset it often requires loads of formatting to get it into a usable version. We’re tackling these two challenges – the accessibility problem and version control to help people make and track changes to datasets. We’re helping developers who want to build on top of open data with their own data as well as organizations interested in sharing open data, but need an accessible way to do so.” – Exversion


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As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

Check out this detailed visualization of NYC’s urban tree canopy by Tom Swanson from ESRI. The map is based on the NYC Parks Department’s high resolution land cover data set, which charts grass and shrubs, bare earth, water, buildings, roads and other paved surfaces. 

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

Check out this detailed visualization of NYC’s urban tree canopy by Tom Swanson from ESRI. The map is based on the NYC Parks Department’s high resolution land cover data set, which charts grass and shrubs, bare earth, water, buildings, roads and other paved surfaces. 

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.


Check out this detailed visualization of NYC’s urban tree canopy by Tom Swanson from ESRI. The map is based on the NYC Parks Department’s high resolution land cover data set, which charts grass and shrubs, bare earth, water, buildings, roads and other paved surfaces. 



Urban trees provide environmental, social, and human-health benefits, but these benefits are hard to measure. Using NYC OpenData, the NYC GIS basemap and object-based image analysis, NYC Parks, the University of Vermont Spatial Analysis Lab, and partners developed a comprehensive land-cover map that includes the tree canopy down to the scale of individual trees.


To create the map, the team relied on high-resolution LIDAR to present the height and texture of land cover as well as multispectral imagery and contextual analysis to distinguish trees according to their physical and spectral properties. Converting high-resolution LIDAR and imagery into usable information took significant processing time and labor, but was an effective method for fine-scale canopy mapping in NYC’s complex urban environment. An article on this innovative use of object-based image analysis was published in the Journal of Applied Remote Sensing in 2012 - abstract available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JRS.6.063567.


View NYC’s land cover data set on NYC OpenData


View the high-resolution land cover map

Parks & Recreation…and Data

Photo: Brian Dalessandro presenting at the NYC Parks DataDive

How does data analysis help the Parks department care for the city’s trees? Learn how DataKind Data Ambassador, Brian Dalessandro, analyzed Parks data to find that the Parks’ tree pruning program reduces emergency cleanups by 22%!

Photo: Brian Dalessandro presenting at the NYC Parks DataDive

How does data analysis help the Parks department care for the city’s trees? Learn how DataKind Data Ambassador, Brian Dalessandro, analyzed Parks data to find that the Parks’ tree pruning program reduces emergency cleanups by 22%!

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Photo: Brian Dalessandro presenting at the NYC Parks DataDive


How does data analysis help the Parks department care for the city’s trees? Learn how DataKind Data Ambassador, Brian Dalessandro, analyzed Parks data to find that the Parks’ tree pruning program reduces emergency cleanups by 22%!


Read the blog post


Check out tree census data on NYC OpenData


 

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DoITT's Albert Webber delivered a presentation on the NYC OpenData portal to a full auditorium at the 2013 hackNY Student Hackathon. This event took place on April 6th at the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, Columbia University. 

Check out the projects from the student hackathon

DoITT's Albert Webber delivered a presentation on the NYC OpenData portal to a full auditorium at the 2013 hackNY Student Hackathon. This event took place on April 6th at the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, Columbia University. 

Check out the projects from the student hackathon

DoITT's Albert Webber delivered a presentation on the NYC OpenData portal to a full auditorium at the 2013 hackNY Student Hackathon. This event took place on April 6th at the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, Columbia University. 


Check out the projects from the student hackathon


Credit: Photo by Matylda Czarnecka from the hackNY flickr

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Aaron Schumacher submitted this data visualization of daily entrances into the MTA subway system. According to Aaron:

"Start with open data, then some processing, and eventually you can make a picture like this. You can also check out the interactive version, where you can see the date and number of entrances for about three years worth of subway traffic. You can clearly see traffic changes around major holidays, and especially the effects around hurricanes Irene and Sandy.”

Aaron Schumacher submitted this data visualization of daily entrances into the MTA subway system. According to Aaron:

"Start with open data, then some processing, and eventually you can make a picture like this. You can also check out the interactive version, where you can see the date and number of entrances for about three years worth of subway traffic. You can clearly see traffic changes around major holidays, and especially the effects around hurricanes Irene and Sandy.”

Aaron Schumacher submitted this data visualization of daily entrances into the MTA subway system. According to Aaron:


"Start with open data, then some processing, and eventually you can make a picture like this. You can also check out the interactive version, where you can see the date and number of entrances for about three years worth of subway traffic. You can clearly see traffic changes around major holidays, and especially the effects around hurricanes Irene and Sandy.”

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Check out this visualization designed and created by Eric Schles and Thomas Levine. Using MTA turnstyle open data and daily weather observations from NOAA, they show the impact that super storms have on subway ridership

Check out this visualization designed and created by Eric Schles and Thomas Levine. Using MTA turnstyle open data and daily weather observations from NOAA, they show the impact that super storms have on subway ridership

Check out this visualization designed and created by Eric Schles and Thomas Levine. Using MTA turnstyle open data and daily weather observations from NOAA, they show the impact that super storms have on subway ridership

Staten Island Counts: Using Data to Tell a Story

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data.


Today we’re highlighting the work of Aileen Gemma Smith, Founder and CEO of Vizalytics Technology, an organization whose mission is to enable change with data. Vizalytics began as an R&D project called Staten Island Counts. Their goal was to use data and visualizations to tell a precise story about the opportunities and challenges for Staten Island communities and businesses.


We condensed the interview we had with Aileen below.


How are you sharing open data with your community?


In Staten Island, information is siloed and not everyone is aware of how much is available, or the potential of merged datasets to give useful insights into needs and opportunities. We’ve shared open data with elected officials and other community stakeholders like the members of Staten Island Chamber of Commerce and members of the Staten Island Economic Development Corporation. People are thrilled to discover how easy it is to access open data.


What type of data does your community find useful?


Hyper-local data is really important. We have gone over 311 data reports of trees, wires, sewer overflows, and crowded drains. After Sandy hit, my partner and I worked from our hotel room (we live in Zone A and evacuated) manipulating data in Google fusion tables from gas station maps and Staten Island business maps. We looked at surge lines and looked at what businesses were within the surge lines. Specifically, we proposed the Staten Island Borough President’s office create maps using Department of Buildings’ red tags, and overlay it with property lot size and values and census info to understand the risk profiles for different neighborhoods.


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The map above shows businesses in Staten Island that were within Sandy surge lines.


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The map above delineates what parts of Staten Island were within Sandy surge lines.


How can open data help a small business?


Not Just Bagels is a local business that’s looking to be more competitive, especially after being hard hit by Sandy. For small business owners the focus tends to be on what they do best, for example, “How do I make a better bagel?”  We help broaden the perspective to, “How do I find more customers? What are influences on my business that might lead to more or less foot traffic?” We help businesses like Not Just Bagels streamline the process about finding more customers by showing open data like bus stops for the express bus who might be coming into the store. Our goal is to show that technology does not have to be scary! It helps you to be more competitive.


How do you help people understand open data and get the information they need from it?


Those who haven’t worked with data don’t know where...

Roadify: Using data to empower people on-the-go

In this dense, bustling city, people depend on mass transit every day, sometimes in different modes, and often multiple times daily.

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data. Our first profile looks at Roadify, a data platform and free iPhone application connecting users with real-time transit info and updates.

In this dense, bustling city, people depend on mass transit every day, sometimes in different modes, and often multiple times daily.

As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data. Our first profile looks at Roadify, a data platform and free iPhone application connecting users with real-time transit info and updates.

In this dense, bustling city, people depend on mass transit every day, sometimes in different modes, and often multiple times daily.


As part of the one-year anniversary of the NYC Open Data Law – Local Law 11 of 2012 – we’re profiling users of NYC Open Data. Our first profile looks at Roadify, a data platform and free iPhone application connecting users with real-time transit info and updates.


Roadify was the Grand Prize winner in the NYC BigApps 2.0 competition in 2010, and alerts users to the latest subway, bus, or driving conditions by using official transit data and real-time updates from commuters. They help answer a basic, vital question posed by millions of commuters daily: “When is my bus/train/subway, etc. coming? And if it’s late, why?”


Data Mashup
Roadify gathers open transit data (including Staten Island Ferry and MTA data) from more than 60 transit agency sources across the United States and Canada, as well as from riders via Twitter and the Smartphone app. This data is:


  1. official/crowdsourced

  2. real-time/static

  3. structured/unstructured

Official structured transit agency data is typically in the Google GTFS (General Transit Feed Specification) format for schedules and real-time arrival information, while unstructured service advisories can be in XML or RSS feeds or via Twitter. Roadify also monitors Twitter to curate comments from riders and agencies about specific transit systems and individual lines, along with user comments provided via the Roadify iPhone app.


Roadify aggregates this information on its own platform and packages the content for hyper-local, real-time distribution to customers via XML feed. Roadify’s digital signage customers can opt to design their own displays for the data feed or use a localized Flash or HTML display in broadcast-ready or interactive mode. Roadify provides transit information on large screens at locations other than transit stations – including Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, “City 24x7” kiosks and the Philadelphia Convention Center.


“All this complexity under the hood is about making it easy for riders to find out what’s going on,” said Roadify CEO Scott Kolber. “If people know when their ride is coming, they’re more likely to use mass transit – and that’s good for riders and cities.”


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Watch the NYC Economic Development Corporation’s “Make it Here” profile of Roadify 

NYC BigApps 2013 Kicks Off at the New York Tech Meetup

The forth annual NYC BigApps competition launched tonight at the New York Tech Meetup. The annual contest encourages software developers and members of the public to create web or mobile applications using official City data. 

More than 1,000 data sets are available on the City’s Open Data portal from 60+ City agencies, commissions, and Business Improvements Districts.

The forth annual NYC BigApps competition launched tonight at the New York Tech Meetup. The annual contest encourages software developers and members of the public to create web or mobile applications using official City data. 

More than 1,000 data sets are available on the City’s Open Data portal from 60+ City agencies, commissions, and Business Improvements Districts.



The forth annual NYC BigApps competition launched tonight at the New York Tech Meetup. The annual contest encourages software developers and members of the public to create web or mobile applications using official City data. 


More than 1,000 data sets are available on the City’s Open Data portal from 60+ City agencies, commissions, and Business Improvements Districts.


Winning applications will receive cash prizes totaling $150,000 and the opportunity to earn follow-on funding for future app improvements. Over the course of the previous 3 competitions, nearly 240 new apps were created.


This year’s contest focuses on working together to solve specific New York City challenges, known as BigIssues (Jobs and Workforce Mobility, Healthy Living, Lifelong Learning, and Cleanweb: Energy, Environment, and Resilience). The best app in each of the 4 focus areas will win a substantial prize, and be eligible for the NYC BigApps 2013 Grand Prize.


The 2013 judging panel includes:


  • Dawn Barber Co-founder, New York Tech Meetup;

  • John Borthwick CEO, Betaworks;

  • Arianna Huffington, Chair, President, and Editor-in-Chief of the Huffington Post Media Group;

  • Lawrence Lenihan Founder, CEO and Managing Director, FirstMark Capital;

  • Ann Li, Managing Director, Center for Economic Transformation, New York City Economic Development Corporation;

  • Rahul Merchant, New York City Chief Information & Innovation Officer and Commissioner, NYC DoITT;

  • Ulrich Quay, Managing Director of BMW iVentures;

  • Danny Schultz Co-founder & Managing Director, DFJ Gotham Ventures;

  • David Tisch Managing Partner, BoxGroup; and

  • Fred Wilson, Managing Director, Union Square Ventures.

Entries are due by 5pm on June 7th, 2013.


Learn more: www.NYCBigApps.com

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nycedc:

Move over Samsung – The Next Big Thing is almost here. We are working with CollabFinder to bring the biggest, boldest, and best BigApps ever! While we can’t divulge our secrets yet, yesterday we gave a sneak peek at Social Media Week event: “We Built this City: The State of Civic Technology, with Code for America and IDEO.”

nycedc:

Move over Samsung – The Next Big Thing is almost here. We are working with CollabFinder to bring the biggest, boldest, and best BigApps ever! While we can’t divulge our secrets yet, yesterday we gave a sneak peek at Social Media Week event: “We Built this City: The State of Civic Technology, with Code for America and IDEO.”

nycedc:



NYC BigApps Is Coming Soon


Move over Samsung – The Next Big Thing is almost here. We are working with CollabFinder to bring the biggest, boldest, and best BigApps ever! While we can’t divulge our secrets yet, yesterday we gave a sneak peek at Social Media Week event: “We Built this City: The State of Civic Technology, with Code for America and IDEO.”


Entering its fourth year, the NYC BigApps competition promotes government transparency and innovative new technologies by challenging mobile and web developers to create cool, free apps for New Yorkers using City data.


Get involved: Sign up now at www.nycbigapps.com to be the first to know about any updates on New York City’s ultimate open data software challenge. Trust us – you don’t want to miss a thing.


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Colorful snapshot of New York City’s Twitter languages. This visualization highlights 8.5 million geo-located tweets collected between Jan 2010 and Feb 2013. Read more: http://spatialanalysis.co.uk/2013/02/mapped-twitter-languages-york/

Colorful snapshot of New York City’s Twitter languages. This visualization highlights 8.5 million geo-located tweets collected between Jan 2010 and Feb 2013. Read more: http://spatialanalysis.co.uk/2013/02/mapped-twitter-languages-york/

Colorful snapshot of New York City’s Twitter languages. This visualization highlights 8.5 million geo-located tweets collected between Jan 2010 and Feb 2013. Read more: http://spatialanalysis.co.uk/2013/02/mapped-twitter-languages-york/

{title}

Today’s data visualizations show 24 hours NYC snow plow activity via data pulled from PlowNYC for an incredible look at NYC Department of Sanitation street clearing efforts. Thanks to @fititinpost42 and @dwtkns

Today’s data visualizations show 24 hours NYC snow plow activity via data pulled from PlowNYC for an incredible look at NYC Department of Sanitation street clearing efforts. Thanks to @fititinpost42 and @dwtkns

Today’s data visualizations show 24 hours NYC snow plow activity via data pulled from PlowNYC for an incredible look at NYC Department of Sanitation street clearing efforts. Thanks to @fititinpost42 and @dwtkns

{title}

nycedc:

Exciting things are underway for NYC BigApps, the City’s premier open data software competition! 

nycedc:

Exciting things are underway for NYC BigApps, the City’s premier open data software competition! 

nycedc:



Exciting things are underway for NYC BigApps, the City’s premier open data software competition! 


While we’re not ready to reveal all the surprises in store just yet, we are excited to announce that NYC BigApps 2013 will focus on leveraging technology to help solve NYC’s key challenges, or “BigIssues.”


CitizenConnect, for example, helps tackle a BigIssue with a focus on income mobility, workforce support, and job placement.


Now is your chance to weigh in on what BigIssues the BigApps community should tackle this year. Share your great ideas and get involved by completing our brief survey!


Photo Credit: Karin Beil via Flickr


NYC Historic Neighborhoods Data Mashup

nycgov:

Do you like exploring New York City and discovering its history?  Check out nychistoricdistricts.com for a map of New York City’s historic neighborhoods and take a virtual tour of places like Brooklyn Heights, Governor’s Island and DUMBO with information on the neighborhood’s history and photos of historic buildings nearby.

nycgov:

Do you like exploring New York City and discovering its history?  Check out nychistoricdistricts.com for a map of New York City’s historic neighborhoods and take a virtual tour of places like Brooklyn Heights, Governor’s Island and DUMBO with information on the neighborhood’s history and photos of historic buildings nearby.

nycgov:



Do you like exploring New York City and discovering its history?  Check out nychistoricdistricts.com for a map of New York City’s historic neighborhoods and take a virtual tour of places like Brooklyn Heights, Governor’s Island and DUMBO with information on the neighborhood’s history and photos of historic buildings nearby.


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Moneyball for New York City

Michael Flowers, Analytics Director for the Mayor’s Office of Policy and Strategic Planning and Director of the Financial Crime Task Force of the City of New York, shares how data science has played a surprising and effective role in helping city government provide services to over 8 million people, from preventing public safety catastrophes to improving New Yorkers’ quality of life.

Michael Flowers, Analytics Director for the Mayor’s Office of Policy and Strategic Planning and Director of the Financial Crime Task Force of the City of New York, shares how data science has played a surprising and effective role in helping city government provide services to over 8 million people, from preventing public safety catastrophes to improving New Yorkers’ quality of life.



Michael Flowers, Analytics Director for the Mayor’s Office of Policy and Strategic Planning and Director of the Financial Crime Task Force of the City of New York, shares how data science has played a surprising and effective role in helping city government provide services to over 8 million people, from preventing public safety catastrophes to improving New Yorkers’ quality of life.



- O’Reilly Strata Conference

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Check out Canopy, a project that came out of DataKind & DoITT's DataDive event a few weeks ago.

adamlaiacano writes:


Check out Canopy, a project that came out of DataKind & DoITT's DataDive event a few weeks ago.

adamlaiacano writes:


Check out Canopy, a project that came out of DataKind & DoITT's DataDive event a few weeks ago.


adamlaiacano writes:


The NYC Parks Department brought full dumps of their databases and a handful of questions. Volunteers brought their modeling, data munging, visualizing, and overall hacking skills.


Our project was provide a good understanding of what the tree diversity is like across the city, and how it is changing over time. The results are above. An interactive map where you can find all of the tree types in the city, the diversity of each census block (“diversity” being the number of unique species seen), some information about each tree type, and more. It was in a near-complete state in just one full day of work from Christopher Reed, Andrew Hill, Brian Abelson, Bennett Andrews, and myself. Chris did all of the front end work and has been updating the project relentlessly, making it better pretty much every day. Andrew set up the cartography database (CartoDB) which exposes an amazing API for querying the data. Bennett pulled in all of the tree information from Encyclopedia of Live. And Brian and I took the raw data provided by the parks department and transformed it into a workable shape.


Huge thanks to Jake Porway and DataKind for putting events like these together. For more information on DataKind, check out Jake’s talk from DataGotham.

Playbook for Gathering, Structuring & Automating Public Data

Last month, we published the Open Data Policy & Technical Standards Manual (TSM), an open data guide for New York City agencies. This publication marks a major milestone in New York City’s open government strategy and the first step for opening all of the City’s data by 2018.

Read the TSM

Last month, we published the Open Data Policy & Technical Standards Manual (TSM), an open data guide for New York City agencies. This publication marks a major milestone in New York City’s open government strategy and the first step for opening all of the City’s data by 2018.

Read the TSM

Last month, we published the Open Data Policy & Technical Standards Manual (TSM), an open data guide for New York City agencies. This publication marks a major milestone in New York City’s open government strategy and the first step for opening all of the City’s data by 2018.


Read the TSM

Love data? Join DoITT and DataKind for our September DataDive!

What: NYC Government DataDive

Where: School of Visual Arts

What: NYC Government DataDive

Where: School of Visual Arts


What: NYC Government DataDive


Where: School of Visual Arts


When: September 7- 9  


This DataDive allows civic hackers to work directly with NYC government agencies and open data to create innovative and exciting new projects. Additionally, there will be an opportunity to speak with representatives from City government through an evening kick-off event. Meals will also be provided throughout the weekend.


Oh, and did we mention, it’s FREE to participate?!


To RSVP and check out a full schedule of events please visit: http://www.eventbrite.com/event/4028174378

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nycgov:

Design and innovation agency, faberNovel, has put together an infographic showing trends in 2011 NYC Subway ridership data. Last year, MetroCards were swiped 1.6 billion times, creating billions of data points publicly available at mta.info. The infographic shows insights such as ridership across the five boroughs, most stations visited and where students go versus senior citizens. faberNovel has also created a poster available for download.

nycgov:

Design and innovation agency, faberNovel, has put together an infographic showing trends in 2011 NYC Subway ridership data. Last year, MetroCards were swiped 1.6 billion times, creating billions of data points publicly available at mta.info. The infographic shows insights such as ridership across the five boroughs, most stations visited and where students go versus senior citizens. faberNovel has also created a poster available for download.

nycgov:



Design and innovation agency, faberNovel, has put together an infographic showing trends in 2011 NYC Subway ridership data. Last year, MetroCards were swiped 1.6 billion times, creating billions of data points publicly available at mta.info. The infographic shows insights such as ridership across the five boroughs, most stations visited and where students go versus senior citizens. faberNovel has also created a poster available for download.


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Gorgeous, interactive map of NYC’s green data created by MapBox. MapBox has placed the code for this visualization on GitHub at https://github.com/mapbox/reinventgreen

Gorgeous, interactive map of NYC’s green data created by MapBox. MapBox has placed the code for this visualization on GitHub at https://github.com/mapbox/reinventgreen

Gorgeous, interactive map of NYC’s green data created by MapBox. MapBox has placed the code for this visualization on GitHub at https://github.com/mapbox/reinventgreen

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nycdigital:

Judges Pick from Reinvent Green: Green, Greener, Greenest is an app that encourages competition between neighborhoods to determine who is the greenest.

nycdigital:

Judges Pick from Reinvent Green: Green, Greener, Greenest is an app that encourages competition between neighborhoods to determine who is the greenest.

nycdigital:



Judges Pick from Reinvent Green: Green, Greener, Greenest is an app that encourages competition between neighborhoods to determine who is the greenest.


Make sure to vote for your favorite Reinvent Green project on the City of New York’s Facebook Page.


NYC Digital: This past weekend, the City of New York took a big step forward to...

nycdigital:

This past weekend, the City of New York took a big step forward to reaching more of NYC’s sustainability goals thanks to individuals and companies in the tech industry. NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability hosted Reinvent Green, the City’s first…

nycdigital:

This past weekend, the City of New York took a big step forward to reaching more of NYC’s sustainability goals thanks to individuals and companies in the tech industry. NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability hosted Reinvent Green, the City’s first…

nycdigital:




This past weekend, the City of New York took a big step forward to reaching more of NYC’s sustainability goals thanks to individuals and companies in the tech industry. NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability hosted Reinvent Green, the City’s first…


NYC GOV: This weekend, NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning...

nycgov:

This weekend, NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability will host Reinvent Green, the City’s first sustainability hackathon. The hackathon — which is a collaborative community coding event in which developers work together to solve a range of challenges using…

nycgov:

This weekend, NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability will host Reinvent Green, the City’s first sustainability hackathon. The hackathon — which is a collaborative community coding event in which developers work together to solve a range of challenges using…

nycgov:




This weekend, NYC Digital and the Mayor’s Office of Long-Term Planning and Sustainability will host Reinvent Green, the City’s first sustainability hackathon. The hackathon — which is a collaborative community coding event in which developers work together to solve a range of challenges using…


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nycdigital:

(Photo Credit: Pieter Dom)

nycdigital:

(Photo Credit: Pieter Dom)

nycdigital:




(Photo Credit: Pieter Dom)


The City of New York is excited to announce Reinvent Green, the City’s first sustainability hackathon.  Taking place at NYU-Poly in Brooklyn from June 30-July 1, the hackathon aims to rally and incentivize the City’s best technology talent to create digital tools and apps that encourage a greener, greater New York.  Sign up for Reinvent Green by clicking here.


Create your own Digital Map based on Made in New York

The City of New York recently unveiled the hugely successful Made In New York Digital Map, showcasing tech startups, workspaces/incubators, and investors throughout the five boroughs.  Since the launch, over 1,600 companies have been added to the map.  Additionally, over 850 of these companies are hiring!

We are proud to announce that the raw data behind the Digital Map is now available on the nyc.gov/opendata site here.  We encourage developers to create innovations based off of the Digital Map data — mashups and analysis are welcome!  If you do create a product, please share it with the NYC Digital team at digital@media.nyc.gov so that we can highlight your work.

The City of New York recently unveiled the hugely successful Made In New York Digital Map, showcasing tech startups, workspaces/incubators, and investors throughout the five boroughs.  Since the launch, over 1,600 companies have been added to the map.  Additionally, over 850 of these companies are hiring!

We are proud to announce that the raw data behind the Digital Map is now available on the nyc.gov/opendata site here.  We encourage developers to create innovations based off of the Digital Map data — mashups and analysis are welcome!  If you do create a product, please share it with the NYC Digital team at digital@media.nyc.gov so that we can highlight your work.

The City of New York recently unveiled the hugely successful Made In New York Digital Map, showcasing tech startups, workspaces/incubators, and investors throughout the five boroughs.  Since the launch, over 1,600 companies have been added to the map.  Additionally, over 850 of these companies are hiring!


We are proud to announce that the raw data behind the Digital Map is now available on the nyc.gov/opendata site here.  We encourage developers to create innovations based off of the Digital Map data — mashups and analysis are welcome!  If you do create a product, please share it with the NYC Digital team at digital@media.nyc.gov so that we can highlight your work.

Visualizing NYC Parks FourSquare Check-Ins

nycdigital:

New York City Department of Parks & Recreation just unveiled a new view of our city. The interactive map displays markers for each time a visitor checks in to one of over 1,250 NYC Parks locations using the foursquare mobile app. These visitors can get tips of fun and interesting…

nycdigital:

New York City Department of Parks & Recreation just unveiled a new view of our city. The interactive map displays markers for each time a visitor checks in to one of over 1,250 NYC Parks locations using the foursquare mobile app. These visitors can get tips of fun and interesting…

nycdigital:




New York City Department of Parks & Recreation just unveiled a new view of our city. The interactive map displays markers for each time a visitor checks in to one of over 1,250 NYC Parks locations using the foursquare mobile app. These visitors can get tips of fun and interesting…


{title}

View photos of our NYC Open Data Policy Hack Day on Saturday at Pivotal Labs. Thanks to all who contributed their time and ideas!

Add your feedback to the NYC Open Data Policy: nyc.gov/datastandards 

View photos of our NYC Open Data Policy Hack Day on Saturday at Pivotal Labs. Thanks to all who contributed their time and ideas!

Add your feedback to the NYC Open Data Policy: nyc.gov/datastandards 

View photos of our NYC Open Data Policy Hack Day on Saturday at Pivotal Labs. Thanks to all who contributed their time and ideas!


Add your feedback to the NYC Open Data Policy: nyc.gov/datastandards 

{title}

Excited about Citi Bike? Using DOT’s open data, OpenPlans has put together a useful trip planner for New Yorkers to use when navigating from one bike share station to the next. Check it out at http://cibi.me/.




Excited about Citi Bike? Using DOT’s open data, OpenPlans has put together a useful trip planner for New Yorkers to use when navigating from one bike share station to the next. Check it out at http://cibi.me/.






Excited about Citi Bike? Using DOT’s open data, OpenPlans has put together a useful trip planner for New Yorkers to use when navigating from one bike share station to the next. Check it out at http://cibi.me/.




Help develop the plan for NYC government to unlock its data

NYC Open Data Policy Hack Day Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 11:00 AM (ET) REGISTER HERE

NYC recently enacted Local Law 11 of 2012, which mandates citywide open data in machine-readable formats through a centralized, publicly accessible web site. The NYC Open Data portal was launched in late 2011 to meet this need. The legislation additionally mandates the creation of technical standards in support of this initiative.

NYC Open Data Policy Hack Day Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 11:00 AM (ET) REGISTER HERE

NYC recently enacted Local Law 11 of 2012, which mandates citywide open data in machine-readable formats through a centralized, publicly accessible web site. The NYC Open Data portal was launched in late 2011 to meet this need. The legislation additionally mandates the creation of technical standards in support of this initiative.


NYC Open Data Policy Hack Day Saturday, May 19, 2012 at 11:00 AM (ET) REGISTER HERE


NYC recently enacted Local Law 11 of 2012, which mandates citywide open data in machine-readable formats through a centralized, publicly accessible web site. The NYC Open Data portal was launched in late 2011 to meet this need. The legislation additionally mandates the creation of technical standards in support of this initiative.


Join NYC DoITT’s team from the Office of Strategic Technology Development and the open government community – policymakers, technologists, civic hackers, app developers, academics, journalists and data enthusiasts – for an engaging day of discussions, drafting, planning and hacking.



Don’t wait until the event: collaborate on NYC’s Open Data Policies, Technical Standards, and Guidelines wiki now.

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Yesterday, Mayor Bloomberg signed into law what he termed “the most ambitious and comprehensive open data legislation in the country.”

The Mayor remarked:
“If we’re going to continue leading the country in innovation and transparency, we’re going to have to make sure that all New Yorkers have access to the data that drives our City. Across City government, agencies use data to develop policy, implement programs, and track performance — and each month, our Administration shares more and more of this data with the public at large, catalyzing the creativity, intellect, and enterprising spirit of computer programmers to build tools that help us all improve our lives.”

Read more on NYC.gov 

Yesterday, Mayor Bloomberg signed into law what he termed “the most ambitious and comprehensive open data legislation in the country.”

The Mayor remarked:
“If we’re going to continue leading the country in innovation and transparency, we’re going to have to make sure that all New Yorkers have access to the data that drives our City. Across City government, agencies use data to develop policy, implement programs, and track performance — and each month, our Administration shares more and more of this data with the public at large, catalyzing the creativity, intellect, and enterprising spirit of computer programmers to build tools that help us all improve our lives.”

Read more on NYC.gov 

Yesterday, Mayor Bloomberg signed into law what he termed “the most ambitious and comprehensive open data legislation in the country.”

The Mayor remarked:
“If we’re going to continue leading the country in innovation and transparency, we’re going to have to make sure that all New Yorkers have access to the data that drives our City. Across City government, agencies use data to develop policy, implement programs, and track performance — and each month, our Administration shares more and more of this data with the public at large, catalyzing the creativity, intellect, and enterprising spirit of computer programmers to build tools that help us all improve our lives.”


Read more on NYC.gov 

{title}

Check out this free iPhone app, created with NYC OpenData.

nycgov:

Check out this free iPhone app, created with NYC OpenData.

nycgov:

Check out this free iPhone app, created with NYC OpenData.


nycgov:



In July 2010, we started giving letter grades to all 24,000 of our city’s restaurants, delis and other eating establishments. These grades let customers know about the results of the Health Department’s periodic check-ups on sanitary conditions. Today, we released the first major study of how the system has worked, and there are four major findings – all of them great news for New Yorkers:


 1)  Kitchens across the city are cleaner.  As of the end of January, a record 72% of restaurants were posting “A” grades in their windows.


 2)  New Yorkers overwhelmingly approve of posting the grades – by 91%, according to a Baruch College survey – and use it to make decisions about where to dine out. 


 3)  Business is booming; restaurant revenues increased 9.3% during the first nine months of the program, compared to just 2.7% in the previous year. It just may be that clean kitchens are as good for business as clean air that is smoke-free.


 4)  Here is the most encouraging sign of all: Over the past year, the number of cases of salmonella infection – the best marker for foodborne illnesses – has dropped to a 20-year low.


No wonder New Yorkers support restaurant grades!  The proof is in the pudding – and more than ever, the pudding is being prepared according to the highest food safety standards. And now, with our brand new iPhone and iPad app finding a clean kitchen around town is as easy as ABC.


{title}

nycdigital:

The New York Times just launched a restaurant inspections map using NYC Open Data.


nycdigital:

The New York Times just launched a restaurant inspections map using NYC Open Data.


nycdigital:



The New York Times just launched a restaurant inspections map using NYC Open Data.




New York Health Department Restaurant Ratings Map


The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene performs unannounced sanitary inspections of every restaurant at least once per year. Violation points result in a letter grade, which can be explored in the map below, along with violation descriptions. The information on this map will be updated periodically. For menus and reviews by New York Times critics, visit our restaurants guide.


-Jeremy White, The New York Times



NYC Zip Code Boundaries
NYC has 262 Zip Codes. Find out which areas of NYC correspond to which Zip Codes below:



Powered by Socrata


Adventures (in code) - Alastair Coote: Think all government data is boring? Think again: a showcase of location data you want to use.

Great post by one of our Reinvent NYC.gov Hackathon winners, Alastair Coote:

alastaircoote:

Great post by one of our Reinvent NYC.gov Hackathon winners, Alastair Coote:

alastaircoote:

Great post by one of our Reinvent NYC.gov Hackathon winners, Alastair Coote:


alastaircoote:



There’s a ton of government data out there- you probably already know that. But it’s no good to you, right? Education statistics, financial reports… very important stuff, of course, but kind of… dry. Not exactly “every day use” sort of stuff.


Well, I’m going to try to challenge that perception a little. I signed up for a contest called NYC BigApps, which is a city-run competition to encourage use of city data. I was pleasantly surprised by the data I found. So, I thought that for a little bit of Friday fun I’d run through some of the more interesting and unexpected geo datasets. At the end, I’m going to discuss how I’m using NYC open data in my BigApps entry, Taxonomy.


The embedded maps you see are provided by CartoDB, which rocks. Seriously, go check it out. Each of the markers are clickable, giving you a sample of what data is available. The data, of course, comes from the NYC Open Data web site. I’m sure other cities have similar data out there- and if they don’t, urge them to release it.


WiFi hotspots



An absolute no-brainer, this one. Everyone needs a WiFi connection every now and then, and this dataset shows you their locations, and whether they are free or paid (in the map above, green is free, orange is paid). The world is crying out for ratemywifi.com - how’s the connection speed? Does the guy behind the counter get angry when you only order one small coffee every four hours? Do you get a cool IP address or some lame 192.168 handout? What’s the hacker to amateur novelist ratio? Surely a billion dollar IPO awaits.


Filming Locations



File this one under “I never even thought of this before”. A ton of stuff gets filmed in New York every year, and of course permits need to be approved before the cameras can roll. It turns out that the New York government has made that data public, going all the way back to the 60’s and before. Maybe next time your friends visit you can assemble a walking tour of your favourite movies. Fun fact: NYC BigApps entry Scene Near Me uses this data to text you when you check in near a filming location. 


Public Bathroom Locations



OK, OK, this isn’t exactly the sexiest dataset going, but don’t try to tell me you wouldn’t use it. Whether you’re in Central Park or just out shopping, no-one wants to buy a coffee just so that you can go to the bathroom- it’s only going to make you need to go again in half an hour. Never was there a greater resource for the public good - bathroo.my, anyone?


Parking Locations



Powered by Socrata


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nycdigital:



The Ticker-Tape Parade and Ceremony for the Super Bowl XLVI Champions New York Giants is underway! There are several street closures downtown, Check out the NYC Street Closure Map.




Outside? Thirsty? There are 1,985 water fountains in NYC Parks.

Find out where they are:

Find out where they are:

Find out where they are:



Powered by Socrata


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nycdigital:



Moving Map Showing One Week of NYC Foursquare Check-Ins


Created by the Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab.


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nycdigital:



Check out NYCBLDGS.COM, one of the hacks that came out of last weekend’s Cleanweb Hackathon. You can find the most- and least- environmentally friendly public buildings in NYC.


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nycdigital:




Interactive Foursquare Check-In Map of NYC


Created by the Columbia’s Spatial Information Design Lab.